Call for Services: Process design & Facilitation for ENoP New Governance
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Call for Services: Process design & Facilitation for ENoP New Governance

Process design & Facilitation for ENoP New Governance

 
Purpose of the call
 

In October 2020, the ENoP Coordination Board and ENoP Secretariat had an Organisational Development Meeting, which focused on smoother cooperation, improvement of processes and finding synergies between the Coordination Board and Secretariat. Beyond that, it explored the different ENoP bodies, mapping out their roles and value. Following this, members of the Steering Committee have held a Brainstorming session in order to reflect on how members see their current and future roles in ENoP, in view of the upcoming General Assembly.

As a reflection of this, a Task Force was formed, composed of representatives of different party families and bodies. In the process of revision of the ENoP structure, the Task Force and ENoP Secretariat will look into current mandates and obligations of each body and see how they align with expectations. They will also look into improving internal processes, boost ENoP’s performance, and determine clear role decisions. One of the main tasks will be specifying the mandate of the ENoP bodies. Such revisions should be done in a structured way in the months to come.

ENoP is therefore looking for an expert to design, facilitate and support this process in close cooperation with the ENoP Secretariat and Task Force.

The expert would have the following tasks:

The expert will design, facilitate and support the process for ENoP new governance. The service should include the following elements:

  • Design, preparation and facilitation of the meetings and working sessions;
  • Interviews and questionnaires for ENoP Secretariat and Task Force;
  • Coaching support for interviews (through the process);
  • Synthesis;
  • Coaching for convergence and presentation to General Assembly;
  • Follow-up.

This list is indicative and non-exhaustive.

Duration & location:

Estimated time: 25 days (non-consecutively)

Location: online or/and in person (depending on Covid-19 safety measures)

Language:

The working language is English.

Desired profile:
 

ENoP is looking for an expert with the following profile:

  • Profound experience in designing, conducting and supporting participatory processes;
  • Experience in moderation of events and meetings;
  • Fluency in English;
  • Experience in working both online and in person.

Application procedure:

Experts with the above-mentioned profile are kindly invited to send offer, CV, experience and draft process proposal. The applications shall be sent to aleksandra.starcevic@enop.eu by 31 January 2022.

For more information about the requirements, please consult the Terms of Reference below.

 

ENoP Position on a Strong Multi-actor Approach in the NDICI Programming
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ENoP Position on a Strong Multi-actor Approach in the NDICI Programming

Considering the lack of multi-actor project opportunities in the last thematic “Civil Society Organisations and Local Authorities” (CSO-LA) programme, the necessity to assist local authorities in developing EU-funded projects, as well as the unique added value of political foundations in CSO-LA projects, the European Network of Political Foundations (ENoP) stresses the importance of encouraging multi-actor approach in the NDICI programming. The benefits of employing a multi-actor approach are particularly important for an effective impact of projects on sustainable development and thematic priority areas for EU’s external action, such as sustainable growth, climate change and peace and governance.

To ensure multi-actor consortia is allowed, when possible, ENoP recommends:

  • Including Local Authorities as eligible (independent) actors, with restrictions for (semi-) autocratic regimes.
  • Ensuring civil society organisations, including political foundations, are considered eligible actors, instead of limiting them to (thematic) programmes dedicated specifically to them.
  • Allowing joint projects applications for CSOs, LAs and other actors from Europe and partner countries, by removing unnecessary restrictions of eligibility criteria.
Supporting democracy through geographic Global Europe programmes
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Supporting democracy through geographic Global Europe programmes

JOINT STATEMENT

Supporting democracy through geographic Global Europe programmes

In view of the public consultation on the Delegated Regulation on Global Europe programming, and in order to make the geographic Global Europe programmes deliver on sustainable development, with a focus on democracy, the European Partnership for Democracy (EPD), the European Network of Political Foundations (ENoP), and the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (International IDEA) have developed the following paper with recommendations.

Joint Publication on Reflections and Distortions - The Electoral Impact of Social Media in Europe
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Joint Publication on Reflections and Distortions - The Electoral Impact of Social Media in Europe

Joint publication of the European Network of Political Foundations and the Centre of International & European Political Economy & Governance on Reflections and Distortions – The Electoral Impact of Social Media in Europe.

To analyse politics in our time, one must take into consideration the advancements in information technology, artificial intelligence – the terms and conditions that shape the digital public sphere. In the last two decades, social media has contributed to a remodeling of the citizens’ relation to politics. It has created a shift in the way political content is disseminated, which consequently affects the political function itself, and citizens’ understanding of political actors. It is therefore not just a matter of political communication, but also of political substance. The quantification of this effect is multidimensional, so its definition becomes elusive. Moreover, even though there is too much data available, no analysis of the phenomenon is sufficiently profound, given that the relevant technology advances at dizzying speeds.

Beyond public perception and despite the accompanying digital buzz, what is the tangible impact of social media on elections, and to what extent can it be quantified? What is social media’s overall political footprint? Are social media platforms capable of shaping an election result or are they just another means of political communication, voter mobilisation and fundraising—a digital community of commentary and criticism, or a medium for political relief? Can their evaluation serve as a predictor of election outcomes?

The present paper attempts to provide answers to these questions and it was published by the European Network of Political Foundations (ENoP) and the Centre for International & European Political Economy & Governance (CIEPEG) at the University of Peloponnese (Department of Political Science and International Relations), as part of the online research program elecionset.org set by the CIEPEG.

The publication aims to present new research data that will contribute to the emergence of new dimensions, to the analysis and evaluation of the phenomenon —both academically and politically— while also serving as a record of the relevant public debate in Europe

ENoP joint statement on NDICI October 2020
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ENoP joint statement on NDICI October 2020

In view of the next round of negotiations between the EU institutions on the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027, ENoP together with 7 civil society organisations and networks, have signed a joint statement, calling on EU Member States and the European Parliament to reverse cuts to the NDICI and to reinforce the humanitarian aid budget in the EU budget talks. 
 

The undersigned organisations and networks call on EU Member States and the European Parliament to:

  • Reverse the cuts to the NDICI by bringing it back to the EC’s 2018 proposal of €78.994 billion in 2018 prices;
  • Reinforce the humanitarian aid budget;  
  • Increase substantially the funding for the thematic and rapid response actions pillars of the NDICI by reducing the allocation to the “emerging challenges and priorities cushion”. More specifically, the thematic pillar should be  increased to at least 11.49% of the NDICI budget, while the rapid response pillar should be increased to at least 3.76% of the NDICI budget.
 
The statement is undersigned by: